Requiem for the Living

In one of his most well-known invitations, Jesus said, “Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest” (Matthew 11:28, NIV).

Today at UPPC, we experienced Dan Forrest’s Requiem for the Living.  The ironic title suggests that the deepest longing in the human heart for rest — assurance, peace, safety, and love — is not something reserved only for those whose earthly lives have ended, as a requiem traditionally would be.  Rather, the piece acknowledges the onerous burden life can become and invites all listeners to accept Christ’s invitation to rest.  Dr. Forrest remarks of the piece: “Let the music speak for itself, and hopefully it will compel all to simply listen for and hear the still, small voice of God.”

In the deepest recesses of our hearts lay the desire to hear this voice.  Like a homesick child after the lights have gone out, there is a wave of dread that washes over us when we realize that neither mom nor dad are in the room next door.  A similar dread emerges when the broken world in which we live casts the future into doubt, and the lights seem to go out on hope.  But this is when it is all the more important to remember the vision that John received while in his own quiet place, in exile on a remote island.  The vision began not with an explanation of the past, nor a foretelling of the future.  Rather, God’s revelation to John began with an image of the present — the eternal present — on which all other divine revelation must rely:

“Immediately I was in the Spirit. And look!
A throne set in heaven, and One sat on the throne”
(Revelation 4:2).

In that place of eternal light, we see the One who understands our weariness and invites us into life with himself, and we are invited to join in with the rapturous response of the living beings surrounding the throne:

“Holy, holy, holy,
Lord God Almighty,
Who was and is and is to come!”
(Revelation 4:8)

For reflection:

  1. An invitation is one half of a conversation, the other being response.  How might you respond to Christ’s invitation to come to him and experience rest?
  2. Experiencing rest is not always easy.  What external obstacles keep you from rest?
  3. What internal obstacles keep you from rest?
  4. If you have experienced divine rest in Jesus, perhaps someone you know needs to know that it is possible.  With whom could you share your experience?

Prayerfully,

MM

 

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