Breaking Sabbath: The Sin that Keeps on Taking

Look, according to scripture, everyone sins. Paul said “all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God” (Romans 3:23). That means that there are ways of being and doing that go against God’s will, which is for us to have an abundant, fruitful life. We get it. And if you grew up going to church, you really get it. And for the most part, people are in agreement about obeying the commandments. I mean, we know it’s bad to steal, kill, and cheat on spouses, right?

But there is perhaps one commandment that is the most shamelessly ignored above all the others: “Remember the Sabbath day by keeping it holy…” Sabbath is more than just “not working.” To keep Sabbath is to reorient our entire selves around a God-given rhythm that balances being and doing. It is, in essence, living according to how we are made.

We all struggle in one way or another with self-worth. And the world sends us a clear (but deceptive) message that our self-worth is tied up in our productivity. But we know better, in our heart of hearts. The psalmist put it this way: “He makes me lie down in green pastures.” He makes me. Why? Because he loves me. And he knows I need to be recreated after a week of toil.

So as we explore the wisdom we with we could tell our younger selves, consider this: “Dear Younger Me: don’t fall victim to the sin of busy-ness that keeps on taking. Instead let God bless you with Sabbath rest.”

Here are three things to doggedly exclude and replace if you want to experience God’s joy on Sabbath:
1) Exclude: Work. Oh boy, this concept has created centuries of debate. But let’s put it this way: “work” echoes God’s description of Adam’s experience of “toil.” So let’s define work as “toilsome deeds which wear us down.” Activities we do on Sabbath, then, are the opposite. Avoiding work doesn’t mean sitting still and doing nothing. It does mean avoiding activities that weary us.
Replace with: Physically Restful Activities. Be honest with yourself about activities that restore you, and limit your Sabbath activities to those things. It might be knitting, hiking, listening to music, or napping. (But it’s probably not watching TV, by the way.) Don’t know what restores your body? Ask around, do some reading, try things. Not anything can be holistically refreshing, but many things can be.

2) Exclude: Buying & Selling. This one will feel like paddling against a tidal wave. The whole world of goods and services are at our fingertips every day, and usually 24 hours a day. It seems crazy to avoid getting gas or groceries, or meeting that friend out for coffee, just because it’s Sabbath. But we are more than consumers. We are spiritual beings who ultimately subsist on every word that comes from the mouth of God. That means we can wait to place that Amazon order until tomorrow.
Replace with: Spiritual Replenishment. Have you ever asked yourself the question: “What gives me the most joy?” It’s not the same question as “What do I do for fun?” Activities that bring us joy replenish and refuel our spirits. And much of the time, they’re free! Spending time with loved ones, reading, walking, and so forth.

3) Exclude: Worry. We might think we’re not working when we glance at that work email. But mental and emotional work can be just as taxing (and sneak up on us!) Depending on what you do for a living or lifestyle, consider how susceptible you are to having worry sneak up on you; and consider your ability to say “no” for a day a week to that worry.
Replace with: Soul Restoration. It can be challenging to think of “activities” that would qualify as “soul restoring,” and we’ve probably already listed a few ideas. But this morning Pastor Aaron put it best when he said, “Dream with God! Make time to celebrate!” I love the image of the child and baby in the cover art because it’s a reminder of how freely we are made to imagine, dream, and feel the free joy of simply being alive.

Here’s the good news this week, folks: You are a creature. You are not the Creator. You aren’t made to go without sleep, to solve the world’s problems, or to constantly produce. God offers — no, commands — the gift of rest because God loves us and wants us to experience life in all its abundance.

For reflection:
1) What is the biggest obstacle you face that makes it hard to keep the Sabbath?
2) Have you ever had a negative experience of keeping Sabbath? What made it negative?
3) Have you ever had a positive experience of keeping Sabbath? What made it positive?
4) Do you believe the world would survive (and thrive) if, in theory, everyone on earth had 24 hours a week of whole-self rest?

Blessings,
MM

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Dear Younger Me: Stop Believing Half-Truths

What if you wrote a letter to your younger self? What age would you write to? And what wisdom would you share? The Bible actually has an entire genre of books called “Wisdom literature.” And much of the time, we know it is better to learn wisdom earlier rather than later. But it’s never too late.

So Pastor Aaron began this Fall teaching series with some foundational wisdom: stop believing half-truths. Half-truths need to be challenged because they are particularly deceptive. And frankly, that makes them more likely to be life-taking rather than life-giving. This was certainly the case with the serpent’s deception in the Garden. The way half-truths can steal life from people is not only something we know about intellectually; we experience the brokenness they create through our own experience and our pastoral relationships as well. So let’s look at THREE half-truths, what’s wrong with them, and the whole truths that answer them.

Half-Truth #1: “Everything that happens is God’s will.”
To get started, we have to get real about the need for biblical interpretation. The truth is that many theological positions can be supported by cherry-picking scriptures out of context (also called “proof texting.”) And to be sure, the sovereignty of God is undeniable in scripture. But so is the brokenness of the world, to which God responds with healing. Psalm 10:14, 17-18 proclaims that God is both King and the encourager of the afflicted. How could the affliction also be thought of as “God’s will”? The whole truth is: Whatever happens, God is sovereign, and able and willing to redeem it.

Half-Truth #2: “God helps those who help themselves.”
Perhaps one of the most destructive half-truths, one Barna survey found that 80% of respondents believed this saying was one of the ten commandments! And yet it never appears in the Bible. Paul wrote to the Thessalonian church that those who do not wor do not eat. But that principle alone cannot be taken out of the context that those early Christians had become lackadaisical because of their belief that Jesus was coming so soon that their daily work did not matter. It is not a universal principle for all people in all times. By contrast, Psalm 18:6, 16 reminds us that when we are in distress, we need not “help ourselves,” but can call on the Lord and he will hear us. The whole truth is: God expects us to participate in this life but always gives grace and mercy.

Half-Truth #3: “God won’t give us more than we can handle.”
People usually mean well when they say this trying to encourage a suffering person. But the irony of the logic is that if it’s true, and we are actually finding we cannot “handle it,” it makes us the problem! It adds insult to injury, implying that in addition to our suffering, it’s our own fault if we can’t handle it. The truth is that there are numerous afflictions we cannot handle, which is exactly why God designs us to live in community. Moreover, the phrase “God gives” anything may be erroneous right off the bat, offering the bad theology that any affliction we experience is in fact God’s will, and he will afflict us right up to the point we’re about to break. (See half-truth #1.) The whole truth is: God will help us handle all the adversity we face.

For reflection:
1) These half-truths are usually shared with the best intentions. Have you ever shared them with someone? How does the idea that they are only half true make you react?
2) Have you ever been suffering and had someone share these half-truths with you? How did you react.
3) Understanding the Bible is difficult because it requires education and interpretation. Where can you go to get help interpreting the Bible so you understand it better?

Many blessings,
MM

Moses: Idolatry and Identity

After rescuing Israel from certain enslavement or death and providing for them in the desert wilderness, God gave them commands by which to live in a covenant relationship with God and each other. The foremost command was to avoid worshiping false gods. That foundational commandment could be likened to wedding vows: have no other “spouse” than me. And the people agreed! They were even given plans to build God a home, the tabernacle (a sort of “mobile home,” actually) so God could live as closely as possible to them.

But when Moses climbed Mt. Sinai to meet with God on behalf of the people, the people let their anxiety overcome them — again, perhaps because of their mistrust — and they broke their covenant with Yahweh. In fact, they did what most people do in the face of anxiety — they reverted to the familiar. In their case, a goddess of Egypt — a golden calf upon which their Egyptian predecessors had relied.

In addition to breaking their covenant in an internal manner (spiritually, emotionally), they even melted down their gold to fashion the calf. This was the gold which was to be used to celebrate the God who had saved them in the creation of his tabernacle (dwelling place). And with that gold, they created their idol. Like adding insult to injury, this action would be like a newlywed who takes his or her new wedding band and gives it to someone else.

What is stunning and sobering as we remember this event in Israel’s history is how quickly it happened — and how quickly it happens to us, too. We were created to worship. It comes as naturally to human beings as eating and breathing. We don’t choose whether we worship, but we do get to choose what we worship. Having trouble identifying what you might be placing on that pedestal? Consider the kinds of sacrifices you make in your life — what you spend the most time and money on, for example. That to which we sacrifice our most valuable resources (time and money) might be one of our idols. What we worship will determine what we are willing to sacrifice.

God is understandably angry at his people’s stubbornness (or impatience, etc.) but this is when Moses really shines–from this point on Moses will be referred to as the “great high priest” because he intercedes on the people’s behalf, for the sake of God’s glory. He shows God he knows that God is the main character of the story, whose plan they are living out, whose plan is to redeem the entire world.

For reflection:
1) What idols draw your love and loyalty away from God? marked by repulsion from corporate, Christ-centered worship? Jesus is for the Body. To know him is to know his Body.
2) have we made Yahweh into an “idol,” like a small fixed statue we want to control and manipulate? When religion becomes secular, power-seeking resource?
3) How can we resist simplistic interpretations about God’s judgment and mercy? So we don’t cherry pick scripture to serve our own worldview? Because the mercy we want from Jesus is only meaningful in light of God’s authority to judge.

Many blessings,
MM

Moses: “Like No Other”

We’ve been dwelling in Moses’ life as told through the book of Exodus since springtime, and it has been a very rich journey. And now we arrived at the foot of Mt. Sinai, where Moses will receive from God perhaps what Moses is most famous for: the Ten Commandments.

So, so much has been written about the Ten Commandments, and even more has been presumed. You might see them outside a courthouse, or tattooed on someone’s arm. They are part of the foundation of western civilization, whether we’re aware of them or not. So let’s take a couple of moments to recap what Pastor Jim Mead taught us today.

What the Ten Commandments are NOT:

  • They are not a set of moral principles. Frederick Buechner said that principles are what people have in place of God. The Ten Commandments are the opposite of that — they are the foundation by which respond to God’s love and join into covenant with God.
  • They are not a pathway to God. Take a look at verse 6: “I am the Lord your God, who brought you out of Egypt, out of the land of slavery.” Do the Commandments begin with expectation? Or do they begin with grace? The relationship always begins with God’s gracious willingness to advocate for people, even to rescue us. And this did not change when Jesus came on the scene. Jesus fulfilled the covenant relationship with the Father, showing us what it means to respond to God’s grace by loving God with our heart, mind, soul, and strength. That love can be expressed through following his “torah,” or instructions.

So what ARE the Ten Commandments?

  • They are instructions to live as we are designed. Human beings, made in God’s image (see Gen. 1:27) are designed to function in particular ways. We aren’t fish. We aren’t elephants. We are human beings. That means we are designed to live in ongoing connection (“relationship”) with the living God, and with each other in mutually loving community. But living as designed is a choice God allows us to make (not true for other creatures, right?) An aspect of God’s image in us is our ability to choose to live contrary to our design. The problem is that just because we choose it doesn’t mean it works. For example, if you drove a 2002 Toyota Tundra (like Jim does) you could operate it as designed, or not. By design, you’d change the oil, rotate the tires, and get occasional tune-ups. Against design, you might ignore those needs, or even try operate it as a boat (which would work, but only for a couple seconds.)
  • They are the foundation for our part of a covenant relationship with God. Like wedding vows, life gets more complicated than the few scenarios we recite on our wedding day. If wedding vows had to list every possible challenge we’d face in our covenants of marriage, the ceremony would last months! Instead, our vows outline the foundations of our covenant, the range of life experience in which we’re committing to partner with each other. After all, we get married because our spouse is “like no other.” Just as God is “jealous” for us, since God is like no other, too. The wedding day is a foundation for the marriage, just as the Ten Commandments are the foundation for the covenant we live with God. Some people resent the idea that God would have expectations of us. But would it be a living, loving relationship if God expected nothing of us?
  • They foreshadow God’s grace as revealed in Jesus Christ. Jesus claimed to fulfill God’s Torah (again, “law” or “instructions”) the way the Israelites were supposed to have done, but couldn’t. Jesus doesn’t do away with it or revise it. He fulfills it, on our behalf, in his own life. And the life God designed us to have is fulfilled in Jesus, too. Jesus lived as we can live. His death conquered the sin and death that separates us from God. His resurrection seals God’s promise that we are made for everlasting life. The Ten Commandments are the day-to-day foundational expression of the greatest commandments, as taught by Jesus:
    37 “’Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind.’ 38 This is the first and greatest commandment. 39 And the second is like it: ‘Love your neighbor as yourself.’ 40 All the Law and the Prophets hang on these two commandments.”

For reflection:
– Have you heard of the Ten Commandments before? What has been your impression of them?
– What do you think about the idea that God has expectations of us?
– Have you learned anything new about the Ten Commandments? What do they reveal about God’s character?

Many blessings,
MM

Moses: “Delegate or Suffocate”

In 2001, I knew an older gentleman in Beflast, Northern Ireland named George. One day, George approached me after a sermon I gave and said, “That was a good sermon, Mike. There is one thing though…” He leaned in: “You’ve got to get your hands out of your pockets! It makes you look like a lazy man!”

Safe to say I don’t think I put my hands in my pockets up front for a long time after that. George really valued being known as a hard worker, and that “Protestant Work Ethic” is very much part of the American landscape, too. It’s just that, no matter hard hard a person works, they cannot do all the work alone.

In Exodus 18:13-27, Moses had been given a specific task by God — to judge God’s instructions and teach them to the people. But the line waiting for his counsel was dawn-to-dusk and ran round and round the block! He needed help, and his father-in-law Jethro knew it. Taking Jethro’s advice, Moses shared his responsibility with capable, trustworthy, God-fearing people, and together they could accomplish that specific task. God’s will is discerned and lived out in devoted community.

This means a few things:

  1. Living God’s will requires various responsibilities. Like a symphony or sports team, the task is shared (in this case, discerning and living God’s will) but the responsibilities can vary. Moses had the responsibility of oversight and final accountability to God. The other judges had responsibility over varying numbers of people. And don’t forget the people — they had the responsibility of actually obeying the counsel they were given!
  2. Living God’s will requires cooperation. It’s one thing to know your responsilbility. But it’s another to harmonize yours with others’ so that you act as a single unit. There are two key points of view on this:
    – Moses/Leader: Sometimes you’re the one in charge, and cooperating with others’ responsibility means (a) sharing control, and (b) trusting.
    – Judges/Cooperative Team: Sometimes you’re not in charge, but you’ve been asked to take on some responsibility. To honor God in that, the team must (a) say “yes” (not much can happen without that), (b) have a team attitude (a begrudging ‘yes’ can be worse than a ‘no’!) and (c) maintain perspective on the larger goal. This last one is key. The “God-fearing” men that Moses needed to choose would have to maintain the perspective that their job as judges wasn’t actually about them, and it wasn’t about Moses. It was about God and blessing the Israelites with God’s will so they could live the abundant lives God wanted them to live.

Here’s the great news (thank Jethro!) When we live God’s will as a devoted community, “everyone will go home satisfied.” That includes the people receiving the counsel and the ones giving it. It’s not God’s will that some people get served while the servants go home exhausted, burned out and cynical. Burnout isn’t righteous; it just gives us a chance to feed our egos. Rather, God’s will is that we share in the responsibility of governing the world in such a way that there is balance, health, and satisfaction.

For reflection:
1) In what ways do you play Moses’ role, as the one in charge? At home? Work? Church? Elsewhere? What challenges do you face as one in charge?
2) In what ways do you play the ‘judges” role, as the one being entrusted with responsibility? At home? Work? Church? Elsewhere? What challenges do you face as the one being given responsibility, but not ultimately in charge?
3) Jesus also entrusted people with responsibility — what can we learn about the character of God by today’s passage, or in the many other ways God expects people to share the responsibility of living out God’s will?

Many blessings,
MM

Moses: Water, Whiners, and ‘What is it?’

Oh boy — this scripture seemed pretty straightforward at first, but as I delved into it I discovered so many treasures! Let’s jump in…

The Israel-ites (that is, descendants of “Israel,” a.k.a. Jacob) are safe. Phew! God has rescued them from certain death at the hands of Pharaoh and/or drowning in the Red Sea. Moreover, God has provided for them for the last month and a half in the wilderness. He purified water for them, will teach them so they can live disease-free, and led them to an oasis (Exodus 15:22-27). But here’s the thing about hunger — today’s hunger makes yesterday’s food seem a long, long way off.

The Israelites’ anxieties rise back up to the surface in an irrational accusation that Moses and Aaron have fooled them and are planning to kill them all (Ex. 16:3) And God answers their anxiety with still more provision! He will “rain down bread from heaven” he promises. And there are three reasons for his provision that we can learn from this passage.

  1. God provides in order to test us. This is not quite as “lovey-dovey” as I would have hoped. It’d be nice to read something like “I will provide because y’all are just so awesome.” But that’s not the first reason God gives. He provides for them to “see whether they will follow my instructions, or not” (16:4). While it might not look good on a Hallmark card, it does make sense. Whenever we’re given resources, we have a responsibility to consider how to use them. It’s like when I got my first credit card — would I spend within my means? Or would I test the limits? The choice is ours.
  2. God provides in order for us to know him. The Hebrew word for “knowledge” (yada‘) refers to a whole-self kind of knowledge that includes intellectual awareness, but especially experiential knowledge that we gain as a process. In fact, it’s ironic that God wants them to “know,” and their response to the gift (manna) is “What is it?” They don’t “know”! But God doesn’t need them to “know” what it is. God wants them to gather it, eat it, and live! Their “knowledge” of God will result from putting their faith into action, regardless of their understanding.
  3. God provides in order to sustain us. Thank God that he knows how we are formed; he remembers that we are dust (Ps. 103:14). And what provision! The Israelites are afraid that everyone will die, but God’s response is that “Everyone is to gather as much as they need” (16:16). Not only would they get enough, but it would also be tasty! The manna was said to have tasted like honey. And meat? What an indulgence! Throughout history, only the privileged get meat. But here, this ragtag group will eat the same abundance they ate in Egypt, but with an added treat — FREEDOM.

For Reflection:
– Describe a time when you felt God had provided for you. What did God provide? Was it enough?
– When God provides for us, how might we “take the test” and use that provision to follow in his instruction?
– Describe a time when you felt pangs of need. What did you need? How did that need make you feel?
– When you’re waiting on God to provide, how might you remain open-minded to the notion that God’s provision might perplex you, (that is, make you say “What is it?”)
– Are you willing to be perplexed in your walk of faith? Willing to lack understanding but follow Jesus’ anyway?

Many blessings,
MM

Moses: Fear vs. Experience

(Today’s message summary was submitted by Lisa Woicik, who gave the message at UPPC on July 21, 2019. Watch it at UPPC.org!

It doesn’t take long after the Israelites leave Egypt before they face what looks like impending death.  Camped at the edge of the Red Sea, they look up and see Pharaoh’s army fast approaching them.  Trapped between Pharaoh’s army and the Sea, they respond, as any of us would – with panic!  Yet, Moses’ response is calm, confident in God’s deliverance. 

Does this seem like the same Moses who seemed to fear and doubt everything God asked him to do (see Exodus 3-5)?  Only a few weeks have passed since Moses let fear get the best of him and questioned God’s intent to help Israel (Ex. 5:22-23).  Now, when death seems to be knocking at the door, Moses is outwardly calm and confident.  How can that be?

When we look at this story, it is helpful to remember that Moses was still human.  He felt fear and panic just like the rest of us do. The difference between the Moses at the Red Sea and the Moses of Exodus 5 is that Moses now had experienced God’s faithful provision at least 10 times.  With each plague that God brought upon Egypt, God told Moses what would happen, Moses followed God’s instructions, and Moses saw God fulfill what was promised.  

Repeatedly experiencing God’s faithful provision allowed Moses’ trust in God to grow stronger.  Just like we trust that the sun will rise tomorrow because we don’t know of a time when it hasn’t done so, Moses’ faith in God grew stronger every time he witnessed God’s provision.  Because Moses was confident in God’s provision, he was able to set aside his fear in that moment and calmly do what he needed to do so that God could deliver the Israelites to safety.  

1.      How have you experienced God’s provision in your own life? 

2.  Have you ever had a moment when you were in full panic mode?  What did that look like?  What brought you out of it?  

3.      When is fear a healthy response?  What does unhealthy fear look like? 

4.      What is happening in your life now that seems unbearable?  How might you be able to practice setting aside your fear and take the next step trusting in God’s provision? 

Blessings,
Lisa Woicik

Moses: Hardened Heart and Passover Lamb

Once Moses confronted Pharaoh, things started to move quickly. Moses warned Pharaoh that God would plague the land if he didn’t let the Hebrews go. He would eventually give Pharaoh not three, not five, but TEN chances to do the right thing. But rather than the plagues softening Pharaoh’s heart, his heart became “hard” and he would not relent. The “hardened” heart is also translated “heavy” (think hard like stone, which is also heavy) which even the Egyptians believed meant that Pharaoh was “unjust.” In fact, their belief system also said that he would be condemned in the afterlife according to the heaviness/hardness of his heart.

The tenth plague is indeed the most disturbing — the death of the firstborn of Egypt. As we read this story, we need to avoid any sort of “Enlightenment arrogance” by which we judge the goodness or badness of the story based on our understanding of right and wrong. Rather, we must defer to the culture of the day, as well as the fact that Pharaoh had been duly warned nine times beforehand, and even warned that this tenth plague would mean the death of the firstborn. And still, he did not relent.

The death of the firstborn sets the stage for the first Passover, which is one of the most important annual holidays celebrated by Jews to this day. So it was no coincidence that Jesus, who of course was Jewish, chose the Passover meal to explain the meaning of his own impending death. He took the familiar elements of bread and wine, used in the Passover meal, and transformed their meaning to reflect his own body and blood, as he would stand in as the once-and-for-all sacrificial lamb, whose death would mean freedom not from worldly oppressors only, but from the ultimate oppressors — sin and death. And not only for a particular people, but for the entire world. Now, Christians worldwide still celebrate that last supper and its meaning through the sacrament of Communion, also known as the Eucharist or the Lord’s Supper.

For reflection:
– Do you celebrate the Eucharist/Communion/Lord’s Supper? If so, describe your tradition.
– It can be hard to imagine the same God who creates life also destroying it. Is it possible to bring our struggle with this aspect of God directly to God in prayer?
– If a “heavy/hard heart” was the symbol for injustice then, what might be a symbol for injustice today?
– What kinds of events/experiences can soften a person’s heart?

In Grace,
MM

Moses: 10 gods, 10 plagues

Pastor Aaron has a friend in Chicago who slow cooks a prime rib for 14 hours every year for Christmas dinner.  But one day in February, he got his natural gas bill, which was for more than $3000!  Turns out the outdoor natural gas for his barbecue had been running since Christmas Eve — for two months. 

This kind of rude awakening, after having done what you think you’re supposed to do, must be a glimpse into the kind of disappointment Moses and Aaron experienced after they initially confronted Pharaoh in Exodus chapter 5: ““Lord, why have You brought trouble on this people? Why is it You have sent me?” (v.22).

Have you ever prayed like this?  “Lord, don’t you care?  Don’t you care about the hostility in our country?  How long will extremists kill, and children suffer?  Where are you when my own family is falling apart?  What kind of God are you?”

God’s answer to Moses is a repeated promise, starting in chapter 6 verse 1: “Now you will see…”  What follows is the story of the ten plagues, starting in chapter 7.   What is especially interesting is the context of Egypt’s religious culture, and the way Yahweh’s plagues addressed their various gods.

In the plagues, Yahweh demonstrates lordship over the entire world, from the supply of the Nile to the fertility symbolized in frogs. The ninth plague, darkness, is the penultimate showdown between Moses, perceived to be a nobody, and Pharaoh, the most powerful person in the known world. Moses spent forty years thinking he was somebody, then forty years learning that he was a nobody, and his final forty years realizing what God can do with a nobody (D.L. Moody).

Even today, our battle is not against flesh and blood. What would Moses say to us today, when our expectations are disappointed? Would he encourage us to take part in God’s “long game,” encouraging us to trust in God’s eternal perspective rather than our own short-term point of view? Even today, we could ask, “Why would God allow Israel to suffer more after Moses obeyed?” But even that question presumes that we know how God should operate. We inadvertently presume we know best, especially from the darkness of our own suffering. And we may not be able to comprehend God’s activity in our lives. But what we can do is trust. “Now faith is confidence in what we hope for and assurance about what we do not see. This is what the ancients were commended for” (Hebrews 11:1-2). This is also what Jesus is commended for (among other things) as he can empathize with our disappointed prayers. Jesus, who asked for God to spare him his suffering, just before the troops came to arrest him.

Do you ever give yourself the time to contemplate that God is at work even though you may not perceive it? Do you ever give yourself the time to ask, “Do I really trust?” It can be a frightening question, but it is the question of the faithful.

For reflection:
– What struggles have you had that made you wonder if God was present or cared?
– Did you find the ability to trust?
– If you did, how did you find it?
– If you did not, how did you cope?
– Do you know someone struggling to believe that God cares, or even exists? How do you relate to them?

In grace,
MM

Moses: Our Call, God’s Power

The actual, burned up bush from my yard.

In my entire life, I have never been near a burning bush. I really haven’t. I mean, campfires, maybe. I’ve seen some brushfires from a distance. But just last week, only a day after revisiting Exodus 3 and Moses’ “burning bush moment,” I was stunned when my next-door neighbor accidentally set aflame a bush that borders our properties. A real-life burning bush right at my house! But alas, this bush did burn up. And the only voices I heard were my neighbors’ and the firefighters.

Moses, on the other hand, did have a dialogue with God, which began in ch. 3 and continues in Exodus 4:1-17. In this passage, Moses has three more issues with the calling God is giving him.

#1: Authority. “What if they don’t believe me?” Moses asks. It’s basically a question of authority. Moses has a valid concern that the Israelites would not recognize that he has any authority over them or Pharaoh. They have no earthly reason to trust that Moses was sent by God. And funny enough, God agrees! So he gives him the grace of three signs to validate his calling. God shows Moses that his calling is defined by God’s authority.

#2: Ability. “I am slow of speech and slow of tongue.” After God shows Moses how God would display His authority, Moses skillfully changes the subject to his lack of ability to speak well. Literally, the Hebrew means “I am heavy of mouth.” What a sensory image of how Moses experienced his limited ability! But God answers again, with this echo of God’s own name in Moses exact point of weakness. The Hebrew literally reads: “I am with your mouth” (the NIV reads “I will help you speak.”) God shows Moses that his calling is reliant on God’s ability.

#3: Action. “Please send someone else.” Finally out of arguments, Moses reveals his real feelings. He just doesn’t wanna. Maybe he’s scared, maybe he’s stubborn, and maybe a bit of both. But Moses doesn’t want to act. He easily forgets that God isn’t telling Moses to be in charge; he is telling Moses to be obedient. God is the one who initiated this exodus plan, and God would be the one to enact it. And Moses learns that his calling is enabled by God’s action.

And it’s a good thing, too. Later, God would send a “new Moses,” Jesus Christ, who would perform signs and wonders, pass through the waters, and suffer in the wilderness, just as Moses did. But Jesus would do more than lead people out of physical slavery in a nation — he would lead people out of spiritual slavery in sin and death. And his calling was empowered by the Father’s authority, ability, and action.

For reflection:
– Have you ever felt “called by God” to do something? What was that like?
– “Calling” can mean a lot of things; what do you think it means in the context of following Jesus?
– Have you ever felt called to something and not been able to say “yes”? Why not?
– Is it possible God is calling you to something in which you have no authority? No ability? Are hesitant to act?

Many blessings,
MM