Moses: “Like No Other”

We’ve been dwelling in Moses’ life as told through the book of Exodus since springtime, and it has been a very rich journey. And now we arrived at the foot of Mt. Sinai, where Moses will receive from God perhaps what Moses is most famous for: the Ten Commandments.

So, so much has been written about the Ten Commandments, and even more has been presumed. You might see them outside a courthouse, or tattooed on someone’s arm. They are part of the foundation of western civilization, whether we’re aware of them or not. So let’s take a couple of moments to recap what Pastor Jim Mead taught us today.

What the Ten Commandments are NOT:

  • They are not a set of moral principles. Frederick Buechner said that principles are what people have in place of God. The Ten Commandments are the opposite of that — they are the foundation by which respond to God’s love and join into covenant with God.
  • They are not a pathway to God. Take a look at verse 6: “I am the Lord your God, who brought you out of Egypt, out of the land of slavery.” Do the Commandments begin with expectation? Or do they begin with grace? The relationship always begins with God’s gracious willingness to advocate for people, even to rescue us. And this did not change when Jesus came on the scene. Jesus fulfilled the covenant relationship with the Father, showing us what it means to respond to God’s grace by loving God with our heart, mind, soul, and strength. That love can be expressed through following his “torah,” or instructions.

So what ARE the Ten Commandments?

  • They are instructions to live as we are designed. Human beings, made in God’s image (see Gen. 1:27) are designed to function in particular ways. We aren’t fish. We aren’t elephants. We are human beings. That means we are designed to live in ongoing connection (“relationship”) with the living God, and with each other in mutually loving community. But living as designed is a choice God allows us to make (not true for other creatures, right?) An aspect of God’s image in us is our ability to choose to live contrary to our design. The problem is that just because we choose it doesn’t mean it works. For example, if you drove a 2002 Toyota Tundra (like Jim does) you could operate it as designed, or not. By design, you’d change the oil, rotate the tires, and get occasional tune-ups. Against design, you might ignore those needs, or even try operate it as a boat (which would work, but only for a couple seconds.)
  • They are the foundation for our part of a covenant relationship with God. Like wedding vows, life gets more complicated than the few scenarios we recite on our wedding day. If wedding vows had to list every possible challenge we’d face in our covenants of marriage, the ceremony would last months! Instead, our vows outline the foundations of our covenant, the range of life experience in which we’re committing to partner with each other. After all, we get married because our spouse is “like no other.” Just as God is “jealous” for us, since God is like no other, too. The wedding day is a foundation for the marriage, just as the Ten Commandments are the foundation for the covenant we live with God. Some people resent the idea that God would have expectations of us. But would it be a living, loving relationship if God expected nothing of us?
  • They foreshadow God’s grace as revealed in Jesus Christ. Jesus claimed to fulfill God’s Torah (again, “law” or “instructions”) the way the Israelites were supposed to have done, but couldn’t. Jesus doesn’t do away with it or revise it. He fulfills it, on our behalf, in his own life. And the life God designed us to have is fulfilled in Jesus, too. Jesus lived as we can live. His death conquered the sin and death that separates us from God. His resurrection seals God’s promise that we are made for everlasting life. The Ten Commandments are the day-to-day foundational expression of the greatest commandments, as taught by Jesus:
    37 “’Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind.’ 38 This is the first and greatest commandment. 39 And the second is like it: ‘Love your neighbor as yourself.’ 40 All the Law and the Prophets hang on these two commandments.”

For reflection:
– Have you heard of the Ten Commandments before? What has been your impression of them?
– What do you think about the idea that God has expectations of us?
– Have you learned anything new about the Ten Commandments? What do they reveal about God’s character?

Many blessings,
MM

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Godspeed: Mission

For the past seven weeks, we have contemplated the notion of what it means to live “at Godspeed” that is, at a pace of knowing and being known. We found inspiration from the documentary film and study sessions by Matt and Julie Canlis by the same title. The sessions, I think, have all been leading us up to today’s theme: Mission.

I was in a coffee shop last week, crowded with a pretty diverse bunch of people, and I had a humbling thought: “What kind of ‘mission’ would it take for even these 30 people to come to know Jesus, much less the entire world?” The world seems so small anymore, but mission “at Godspeed” probably starts for us as it did for Jesus’ first disciples — one person at a time.

Luke 9:1-6 tells of the first time Jesus entrusted his mission to ordinary people. He told them to do basically what he had just been doing, which Luke records in ch. 8: touring villages, proclaiming the good news, and healing the sick. They were witnessing the “inbreaking Kingdom of God.” Jesus inaugurated this New Creation, and in Him we are called to live and share it.

First, we must live our lives IN CHRIST. That phrase describes the Christian life 165 in the Bible, while the idea of being “saved” occurs 108, and the idea of Jesus being “in me” is used only six. To be in Christ means to steep the ordinary in what is holy, so we begin to experience the holy in our ordinary.

When we live in Christ, we naturally share that holiness we experience. To share it as Jesus did means we have to earn people’s TRUST and offer GRACE. Jesus and his disciples earned trust by being vulnerable, by listening and responding to people’s real lives, and by bringing their proclamation as a free gift, without expectation of reward. Especially in a world that no longer intrinsically trusts the Church, we are called to share requires that we humbly earn people’s trust, one person at a time.

For Reflection:
– Have you ever been on a “mission”? Describe it.
– When you think of a Christian mission, what comes to mind?
– Is it an act of kindness or not, to offer someone something you value? Is there a way to approach Christian mission in this way?
– What kinds of sacrifices might the western Church need to make to earn the secular world’s trust, and open a conversation about Jesus?

Many blessings,
Mike

Godspeed: Rooted

In any culture, we are shaped by forces which we don’t choose but which have enormous influence over our lives, our perceptions of ourselves, our world, and even God. Today, one of those forces appears to be “individualism,” otherwise known as the “self-made person.”

But that’s just not how things work, is it?

Consider the human body, as one basic example. As a metaphor (there are always exceptions if we take this analogy too literally), it reminds us that a single living organism is actually a series of interdependent living things. In fact, when the body isn’t operating interdependently, it is said to be in a state of “dis-ease.” So it is with the Church, which Paul called the “Body of Christ.”

The health of the interdependent Body is largely determined by its stability. If the parts of the Body aren’t stable, then the whole Body becomes less stable. Benedictine monks understand this when they take their vows, one of which is the vow of “stability,” that is, the willingness to live in a particular community for the rest of their lives, through thick and thin, and to renounce the endless (and fruitless) search for greener pastures elsewhere.

The corporate nature of life in Christ is emphasized throughout scripture. In other words, salvation is not just personal. We are saved into something greater. We are baptized into something greater. We eat the Communion meal in the presence of something greater, as we anticipate something greater, that is, the fulfillment of God’s kingdom.

Sometimes our lives are thrown into seasons of instability, when we feel uprooted. Failing health and the death of loved ones; struggling relationships and divorce; corporate lay-offs, or corporations moving employees to new locations; military families moving every three years; these are legitimate and real reasons we can become uprooted. The call to be a rooted people is not meant to indict our real-life situations, but rather, to acknowledge that ultimately we need stability in a community with deep and healthy roots as we seek to know ourselves, our God, and our place in God’s world.

For reflection:
1) Are currently feeling “rooted” or not? What are the factors contributing to your answer?
2) Is there a way to feel “rooted” if forces outside of our control (job, health, etc.) are making us feel unrooted? What ways might there be?
3) Do you know someone whose life has recently been “uprooted?” Pray and ask the Holy Spirit to guide what you might do to bless that person this week.


Godspeed: Identity

When God created the world, he called it “good.” But when he was finished with his final piece of creation — human beings — he exclaimed “Look! Good!”* Why?

“Identity” is a buzz word in our culture these days. But among the many ways people describe their identities, few people are discussing how they arrived at their description. Are we the authors of our own identity? If not, where do we find it? In the Bible, it starts…well, at the beginning. When God created human beings, he made them (male and female) in the imago Dei — the image of God. The gleeful exclamation in Gen. 1:31 is just a glimpse at how God rejoices over people, whom he creates to reflect his glory more than any other part of creation. God rejoices over you. Therein lies the core of our identity — we are the beloved of God.

But what happens when we forget, or choose to forget, or have not yet heard this great news? We become driven by a need to prove ourselves. Driven by fear of failure or inadequacy, rather than by the joy of being God’s beloved, we scrape and fight our way through the world, trying to make a name for ourselves, trying to secure a place for ourselves.

But as bearers of God’s divine image, we have a name. We have a place. This simple concept is part of the reason why the story of the Samaritan woman at the well in John 4 is one of the best in all the gospels. Here was a woman who had been given many labels. Surely she had given herself a few, and doubtless others had many names for her. Shunned from normal society, she was compelled to fetch water at midday when no one in their right mind would be out in the hot sun. It was there, in the illogical place, that Jesus met her. He broke rule #1: don’t travel through Samaria. Then he broke rule #2: don’t speak with Samaritans. And finally, rule #3: don’t share a cup with a Samaritan!

But he didn’t care. Jesus knew who all that this woman had done. He knew who this woman was. She was God’s beloved. And he wanted to tell her. As this powerful spoken word poem reminds us, “to be loved is to be known.” And so for the first time in John’s story, Jesus revealed his true title to her: Messiah (in Greek, “Christ.”) And she ran off to tell everyone she knew about him.

For reflection:
1) To know our identity as God’s beloved, we must listen for God’s loving voice — when this week could you find an extended time to set everything aside and just listen? It might take longer than you think to silence the noise in your mind.
2) To know our identity as God’s beloved, we must be reminded. Find a place to put these words somewhere you’ll see them every day: “You are my beloved child, whom I love.”
3) To know our identity as God’s beloved, we must also help others know their identity as the same. Who is a “Samaritan woman” in your life who may need to hear that she or he is loved by God? Do you have the courage to share that good news with them?

Many blessings,
MM


*Gen. 1:31, Septuagint. Most translations read “very good.”

Godspeed: Pace

God is a great gift-giver, even though we often neglect or refuse his gifts. One of the most famous is this invitation from Jesus: “Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest.” Right away in the next verses, Jesus shows us one of God’s main gifts — Sabbath.

Sabbath basically means “rest,” and ever since the beginning, it is the way God has set the pace of our lives. It’s even one of the ten commandments! Over the centuries, there have been countless interpretations of what it means to honor the Sabbath, and during Jesus’ earthly life there were two basic approaches, which I’ll call External and Internal.

The external approach is like the “letter of the law.” You consciously choose to do what it says, regardless of circumstances. The internal approach is like the “spirit of the law,” when the focus is on whether or not the law’s goal is being met, and then adjusting your practice accordingly. These two basic approaches are the crux of many arguments about how to honor the Sabbath: either an objective or subjective approach. But an either-or misses the mark.

Jesus’ approach to Sabbath was both-and: we both make intentional, measurable choices to shape our lives around the Sabbath (external), and we remember the purpose of Sabbath and make occasional adjustments so the purpose is being met (internal).

When Jesus’ followers picked grain on Sabbath, they weren’t abandoning God’s law. They were hungry. And Jesus used the occasion to show us that in every situation we can shape our lives around God’s pace — we can intentionally set aside time and adjust when we need to.

One of the most helpful ways to understand Sabbath comes from the Jewish theology of the temple. In the Godspeed documentary series, N.T. Wright highlights that “The Jews will tell you that the Sabbath is to time what the temple is to space…the temple is the place where heaven and earth meet, and the Sabbath is when our time and God’s time intersect.”

Are we accepting God’s invitation to experience this intersection of the divine and earthly? To fully know that God is both transcendent and imminent; both beyond us and intimately near? This is the gift of Sabbath, and we’re being invited back to set our pace by it and live at Godspeed.

For reflection:
– Take a look at this week’s schedule. Consider canceling one appointment or somehow opening up just one hour to create Sabbath-space.
– Consider what you might do in your Sabbath-space that lifts your spirit heavenward (plain old idle time rarely does the trick); make a list and fill your Sabbath-time with those activities.
– As you make a habit of creating small Sabbath-spaces in your schedule, challenge yourself to gradually increase that space with the goal of having a full day each week that is an experience of God’s presence.

Godspeed: Presence

If you heard there was a disease that was rampant throughout your community, would you want to know more about it? Given the emergency status of the measles outbreak in Washington state alone, my guess is you would.

There is a problem that is robbing people of a sense of ease in their daily lives: a “dis-ease” called busyness. Busyness may even be more harmful than most physical diseases because unlike those, busyness often feels good while we experience it. Being busy can make us feel important or productive. And most of us do little or nothing to become less busy.

Spiritually, one problem with busyness is that it also robs us of our ability to know God’s presence. Last week, we looked at the notion of “Place” and remembered that while we often ask “Where is God?” God is asking the same — “Where are you?” In a culture that is increasingly competitive and socially networked, our answer might all too often be “Where am I? Well I’m busy, of course.”

The story of Ruth is well-known among students of the Bible, but you rarely see it on wall posters or verse-a-day calendars. And yet it is one of the most powerful stories of commitment to presence in scripture. Ruth herself is a widow with a chance to start over. She has every reason to think of her own best interest. But instead she sets that aside and chooses to live fully present with her mother-in-law Naomi, for the rest of her life: “Wherever you die, I will die, and there I will be buried.” (Ruth 1:17)

To be sure, there are many demands on our daily lives that we cannot run from. Life happens. Nevertheless, we are invited, and even commanded, to keep an account of the lifestyle we can choose and decide whether or not we will choose to be open to experience the presence of God.

For reflection:
– Make a list of the things in your life keeping you the most busy; which do you have the power to change (don’t forget to include how you spend your spare time).
– What is standing in the way of being fully present to God? Being fully present to the people in your life?
– What are some simple choices you could make to become more fully present, even just for the next week? Journal about your experience.

Many blessings,
MM

Godspeed: Place

“There’s no place on this earth without the potential for unearthing holiness.” –Eugene Peterson

This Godspeed concept challenges us to live at “Godspeed” – a way of life that puts us in the place to be face to face with God and with each other. And ever since our human parents were infected with sin, we as a human race have been hiding from God and yet, in the depths of our hearts, desiring to know where we can find God.

This tension is found in John 4:19-26. Jesus is in the middle of an exchange with a woman who had been running, hiding through a maze of relationships, an outcast who was seeking water from a well in the middle of the day. Jesus has just had a very direct conversation about her personal life. Jesus in essence is saying, “where are you in your life right now?”

Ironically, the woman shifts the awkward personal conversation to the hot topic of the day– which location is the place where God is to be found? I think the original hearers would see the humor in this. She’s staring the God son in the face… proposing where he can is found.

And of course Jesus gets right to the point: God is not in Rome or Mecca. Not in the places where you think you must go to find God, Jesus said. “God is spirit, and his worshipers must worship in the Spirit and in truth” (4:24).

I’ll never forget a moment 5 years ago when in the middle of the week, a couple came into our sanctuary and was right here on the stairs weeping, full bodied grief and they were desperate. They were pleading with God to take care of their baby girl, just months old, who passed away in her sleep the night before. They were stricken with overwhelming grief and even though they weren’t people of faith, they sought the only place they could think of to find God. This place. And they met God here through the people of this church.

But was more profound was that the concept of where God was found (here in sanctuary) was changed when I shared that I was actually standing outside their home the night before. As it so happened, I was helping my brother move and his home was down the street. I had heard the wailing and went over, praying in their front yard. I had unknowingly been part of God’s bringing many people to them over that awful time. God was present, God was moving toward them. Not only in a sanctuary but their home. You see Jesus is revealing the way of Holy Spirit as fundamental about this sanctuary as it is everywhere else:

Jesus redeems the idea of Place not by making it insignificant but by making all places significant because of the presence of the Holy Spirit.

Jesus is here. Spirt is here. In fact, part of the point of Jesus’ mission, to bring the life of heaven to birth on earth, was that from now on holy mountains wouldn’t matter that much. The Holy places wouldn’t have a monopoly on the encounter with God.

For Reflection:
– Do you have any “sacred” places in your life? What makes them so special?
– Can you envision the place you are right now as a sacred place? What would have to change to make it seem sacred?
– This week in prayer, each day make yourself fully available to God, like Isaiah did, and pray: “Here I am, Lord.” Journal about your experience.

This week’s post comes straight from UPPC senior pastor, Aaron Stewart.

The concept of “Godspeed” is inspired and informed by the work of Matt and Julie Canlis in their documentary film and study sessions. Learn more at http://www.livegodspeed.org

Getting Up to Speed

Having wrapped up our Advent/Christmas series, “Down to Earth,” this week we kicked off the new year with a new series: “Godspeed.” Our hope for this series is that you would have rekindled hope that it is within reach to live the abundant life Jesus wants you to live: “I have come that they may have life and have it to the full.” (John 10:10)

The idea of Godspeed was planted, like a seed in my mind and heart, when I ran across the documentary film, “Godspeed,” which is about learning to live at a pace of fully knowing and being known.

One of my favorite stories in the Bible illustrates this kind of lifestyle. Luke 2:41-52 tells of the time 12-year-old Jesus wandered off from his group traveling home to Nazareth after the Passover festival. Three days of anxious searching later, and Mary and Joseph find Jesus in absolutely no hurry at all, sitting in the temple courts having theological conversation! While they are experiencing the utmost hurry (understandably enough) Jesus seizes the opportunity to ask a powerful rhetorical question: “Didn’t you know I had to be in my Father’s house?

Of course, this is Jesus’ first proclamation of his divine Sonship. But the story came to mind in this week’s context because of the stark contrast between two ways of living — one dictated by the world’s pace, traditions, and expectations. And the other — Jesus’ pace — dictated by God the Father. Jesus’ “Godspeed” lifestyle would continue, of course, and continue to perplex people for many years to come.

As we enter this series, one of the most important aspects to remember is this — Godspeed is not just about “slowing down,” but more specifically about “being present.” There would be times when Jesus was in solitary prayer, and there would be other times when Jesus was being mobbed by crowds in the city center. In any instance, Jesus remained fully present to the Father and made his choices in perfect alignment with the Father. Busy or bored, all of life can be lived with the habit of being present.

For reflection:
– Do you feel hurried in your daily life? What makes you feel hurried?
– Have you ever had an experience of “Godspeed,” that is, being fully present to God and to the moment in which you were living? Describe it to someone.
Psalm 46:10(a) reads “Be still, and know that I am God.” Does this mean to stop everything you’re doing? If not, what does it mean?

May we all learn to live the abundant life Jesus came to give us.
MM

Perplexity, Inquiry, Clarity

I was pretty baffled as a kid about twelve days the famous Christmas song referred to. There were 24 days on the Advent calendar, 8 days in Hanukkah, 4 Sundays of Advent in church…which 12 days was it?

The Twelve Days of Christmas refers to the twelve days starting with Christmas and ending the night before Epiphany on January 6, which commemorates the visit of the wise men, or Magi, to the baby Jesus. Along with the rich theological meaning of their visit, this year I got to wondering about their personalities — what kind of people sacrifice so much out of curiosity?

The Magi must have been perplexed by what they saw in the stars, and their willingness to inquire resulted in their clarity — a moment of epiphany that inspired them to rejoice with exceeding greatness (“overjoyed” in the NIV.) Jesus’ life would continue to puzzle people, including his closest followers. As the Magi did at the beginning of Jesus’ life, so Jesus’ disciples would do toward the end of his earthly life. John 16:16-24 records part of a longer dialogue where we can see the disciples moving from perplexity, through inquiry, and eventually to clarity.

When we are perplexed, or even when our worldview feels threatened, there are some unhealthy ways to react. We can react with fear, by fighting new ideas or running away from them. We can react with cynicism, deciding that it’s not worth it to seek knowledge and understanding. But as author Carey Nieuwhof puts it: “An incredibly effective antidote to cynicism is curiosity” (Didn’t See It Coming, 2018, p. 26). That leads to inquiry.

When we inquire about Jesus, God, or other aspects of life and faith, we should remember that asking is part of faith, not antithetical to it. The disciples had no idea what was going on for most of their experience with Jesus recorded in the gospels. And yet they were people of great faith. And if you are someone who gets asked a lot of questions, do what Jesus did: engage. Graciously offer Biblical answers if you have them. Humbly admit when answers elude you. And then reengage the process of inquiry again, even with others who are asking good questions.

Finally, clarity is promised by Jesus, but on the one condition that we make our inquiries and requests “in Jesus’ name.” What does that mean? It means aligning our desires with God’s will, just as Jesus’ will was perfectly aligned with the Father’s. It means, to the best of our ability, asking for what Jesus asks for. Seeking what Jesus seeks. Relinquishing our own agendas for the world and anticipating God to give us the clarity we need, when we need it.

For reflection:
– What is something the Christian faith proclaims that you find perplexing? (If you can’t think of anything, what do you think other people might find perplexing?)
– What sorts of things might you ask God for that you believe align with God’s will?
– Have you ever had an “epiphany” about Jesus, God, or yourself? Find someone to tell that story to!

Many blessings in this new year!
MM

Down to Earth: Flesh Comes Down

I’ve noticed a disconnect in our midst.  Pretty much everything I’ve read and everyone I’ve talked to bemoans the divisiveness in our culture these days.  No one seems to be celebrating it.  But on the other hand, most people seem to also agree that the divisions are increasing, not decreasing.  So, why the disconnect? 

One possible reason is because of all of the talking.  Beyond interpersonal dialogue, the internet has become a free-for-all of anyone’s ideas about anything.  So much talk that can lead us to create our identities around ideas, rather than actual issues.  And these “identity-based ideologies” are “by the far the more potent predictor of social distance.”*

In his brief letter to the Philippians, Paul is writing  to a church struggling with divisiveness, and he offers one of the most theologically and poetically rich passages about Jesus in all of scripture, and maybe in all Christian literature.  In only 3 verses, Paul describes the lengths to which God went to surpass mere talk of love and instead show his love to us in the flesh.

In Jesus, God is present in the flesh. 
Jesus’ birth in the manger is much more than just the arrival of a great prophet or teacher.  And Paul describes God’s presence in Jesus in two distinct ways.

1) In Jesus, God is present in the flesh as God.  
Jesus “very nature” is God, and he shares “equality” with God.  Paul begins this way because if we miss Jesus’ divinity, we miss the miracle of Jesus’ birth in the flesh.  It is precisely because Jesus’ very nature is divine that his birth fulfills the promise of Isaiah, that God would dwell with us.  Jesus’ birth as God among us fulfills the deepest human longing to be near the Creator.

2) In Jesus, God is present in the flesh as human.
God’s choice to be human does not empty him of his divinity.  The phrase in the NIV “made himself nothing” can be misleading.  The Greek verb kenoō denotes an emptying but is used figuratively to connote a neutralization of effect, or an emptying of significance.  So Jesus did not relinquish his equality with God, but rather chose to lay his divine power aside in his life in the flesh.  N.T. Wright puts it this way: “The decision to become human, and to go all the way along the road of obedience — this decision was not a decision to stop being divine. It was a decision about what it really meant to be divine,” which is to offer self-sacrificial love.**

Jesus’ human life reveals what it means to be divine, and also what it means to be human.  It is to be God’s image-bearers, capable of loving our communities as God loves — in the flesh.  

Faith in Action: 
1) What is one practical step you could take this Christmas season to embody God’s loving kindness in person?  Who needs to hear in your voice or see in your face God’s down-to-earth love?
2) Maybe even more challenging — from whom are you longing to experience that in-person kindness?  Is there someone who should know that you need to reconnect, even reconcile with them? 

Many blessings this Advent,
MM   

*”Why Has America Become So Divided?” Psychology Today, 9/5/18.
**N.T. Wright, NT for Everyone, Philippians 2:6-8.